beouija:

Illustration for a complicated article about the legend of John Henry, the appropriation of black music by white people, and violence toward black people by whites. For The Oxford American.

I write a little bit about making this piece here and here.

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible important, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.

The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”

So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.

There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

http://alexwrekk.tumblr.com/post/95931055754/jealouzine-sos-tendrillz

withregardto:

jealouzine:

sos

tendrillz:

californiablackhole:

tarae:

tendrillz:

alexwrekk:

zine-reviews:

tendrillz:

sooooo joe biel is gonna be at the sf zinefest. what should we do about it? message me if you have any ideas. they did an interview with…

I am tabling SFZF this weekend and I am watching how this issue plays out. I wanted to share for my friends who are also attending. Everyone should be aware of SFZF’s lack of a safer space policy.

If “Tom” was not speaking on behalf of the other organizers/volunteers, he should not be replying to a message that was meant for that group. The lack of sensitivity displayed in that email is extremely troubling; this person should not have access to people’s messages of concern. At this point, it does come across as representative of the organizers.

Hi, this is Channing Kennedy, one of SFZF’s organizers and host of a few of the fest’s events. We now have a Safer Spaces policy in place, which will be posted publicly at the expo space this weekend, and we’ve also issued this public statement about it on the blog. As the statement says, it’s on us, the organizers, that we didn’t have this in place much sooner. And while we don’t imagine that this will solve every issue that can arise in DIY/radical spaces, we hope that this will serve as a starting point to make SFZF as good as it should be.

If anyone has questions or concerns that they’d feel more comfortable sending to me directly, my email is channing@channingkennedy.com.

A factual correction to Tom’s email: Joe Biel is not and has never been a ‘featured guest’ at SFZF 2014. All exhibitors have been invited to fill out a short questionnaire for the SFZF blog, and that’s what he did, nothing more or less.

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

We had so much fun uncovering gilded and fanciful book cover after gilded and fanciful book cover for our recent Summer of Archives feature that we thought we’d share a few more just for the heck of it. These five covers were designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962) and Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944), our two most favorite designers of the bunch.

A bit about Armstrong:

"Margaret Armstrong was among a number of important woman cover designers, beginning her work in the late 1880s. She began her career at A.C. McClurg and then went on to other publishers, primarily Scribner’s, for whom she designed half of her total output of about 270 books." [source]

And Bradley:

At the peak of Will H. Bradley’s career in the late 19th and early 20th century he was acknowledged as one of the premier American graphic artists of his time and had made a marked impact on fine and commercial graphic arts. He contributed to the growth of various artistic movements within the United States and influenced developments in illustration and layout practices in the book and periodical arts. He did not restrict himself to a narrow range of styles, and his body of work, including his publishers’ bindings, shows him to be one of the more diverse artists of his generation. [source]

Love vintage book covers? DPLA’s got you covered.

Image credits

  1. Binding for “Like a Gallant Lady" (1897 edition) by Kate M. Cleary. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
  2. Binding for “The Quest of the Golden Girl" (1896 edition) by Richard Le Galliene. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
  3. Binding for “A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" (1911 edition) by Henry David Thoreau. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available
  4. Binding for “Astoria, or, Anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains" (1897 edition) by Washington Irving. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.
  5. Binding for “The Bird’s Calendar" (1894 edition) by H.E. Parkhurst. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Full text available.

prynnette:

You’ve probably never heard of Jackie Ormes and that’s an utter tragedy. But it’s not surprising—there is no “Jackie Ormes Omnibus” available on Amazon.com, no “Collected Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger,” no “Essential Torchy Brown.” She won no awards, can be found in no hall of fame, and is usually treated as “an interesting find” by comic historians. She’s become a curio, a funny little facet of history, undiscovered, even, by today’s wave of geek-oriented feminism.

Jackie Ormes was the first African-American woman cartoonist. Yeah. That’s who we’re ignoring. Her work for the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender—both incredibly influential African-American newspapers—was utterly groundbreaking and remains unique, even in the context of modern comics. Her first work, Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem, featured the adventures of the titular Torchy, a stylish, intelligent young African-American woman who (feigning illiteracy) boards a whites-only train car to New York City and changes her life. Torchy’s story is a great, irreverent window into the migration of Southern-born African-Americans to the North, a movement that defined 20th-century America—but it is also the story of a girl on her own, living her own life and making her own choices. Torchy was an incredible aspirational figure, the likes of which barley exists in modern comics: an independent, optimistic, fashionable and adventurous black woman. Ormes would later revive Torchy’s story in Torchy in Heartbeats, a strip that introduced international adventure into the heroine’s life. In Heartbeats, Torchy traveled to South America, dated idealistic doctors, battled environmental exploitation and confronted racism at every turn. She was, frankly, awesome

And then there was Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger, her most successful and longest-running work. Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger was a single panel gag strip, like Family Circus—an illustration with a caption beneath it. Ginger was a beautiful, stylish young woman always accompanied by her little sister Patty-Jo, a clear-eyed, sardonic kid who spent most strips calling out the bullshit they endured on a daily basis as black women. Ormes’ talents shine through especially well in these little stories: her canny wit, the absolutely gorgeous clothes she drew her women in (seen also in her Torchy Togs paper dolls) and her skillful, succinct way of imparting to the reader just how goddamn stupid our society can be about gender and race. Patty-Jo is never shamed or taken down a peg for being an intelligent, outspoken little girl—in fact, she was made into a highly popular doll that wasn’t an obnoxious Topsy-style stereotype. She preceded Daria, Emily the Strange, Lian Harper, all those wry little girls we celebrate today—and yet, I see her on no t-shirts, can find her in no libraries. Patty-Jo is celebrated only in doll-collecting circles at this point, as the cute little symbol of a bygone age.

At Jackie Ormes’ height as a cartoonist, her work reached one million people per week. In the 1940s and 1950s, she reached one million people per week. She didn’t just surpass barriers—she leapt merrily over them. She introduced the general populace to a voice that had always existed, but was seldom heard—a voice that is still smothered today. She created African-American women who unapologetically enjoyed glamour, who pioneered their own futures, who refused to keep silent about the walls they found themselves scraping against every day. I haven’t even covered the half of it: Ormes was also an avid doll collector, served on the founding board of directors of the DuSable Museum of African-American history, and was targeted by the McCarthy-led witchhunts of the 1950s. Remember Jackie Ormes. Celebrate Jackie Ormes. Visit The Ormes Society and support the essential work they do. Keep her memory alive so that we may enjoy a million more Torchys and Patty-Jos in our comics—instead of the paltry handful we are offered today.

(First in a series on women in the comics industry.)

tusksfamily:

withregardto:

emilyaldenfoster:

IMPORTANT BUSINESS LADIES’ COMMERCE TABLE WILL BE CRUSHING THE COMPETITION AT SAN FRANCISCO ZINEFEST 2014.

BRING ALL THE WORLD’S MONEY TO TABLE 104 IN EXCHANGE FOR THE HIGHEST QUALITY ZINES MADE BY THE BEST PEOPLE FOR THE BEST VALUE.

US CURRENCY AND CREDIT CARDS GLADLY ACCEPTED.

ABIGAIL YOUNG - EMILY ALDEN FOSTER - JENNIE YIM

TWO DAYS ONLY!
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 11 AM - 5PM
SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 11AM - 4PM

San Francisco County Fair Building
1199 9th Ave and Lincoln Way
(in Golden Gate Park)

FREE ADMISSION LEAVES YOU WITH MORE MONEY TO SPEND ON OUR ZINES!

GET YOUR COPY OF THESE ZINES
The Important Business Ladies’ Guide to Important Business for Ladies
Camel Toe
An Illustrated History of Personal Failure
A Humorless Treatise on Onomastics
Pork
Cross My Words and Hope to ___ (VERB)
The Book Reporter
Papa Yim Storytime
Would You Drink a Soda…
Museein’
Something to Someone
AND MANY MORE

PLUS A SMALL SELECTION OF OTHER SURPRISING ITEMS!

COLLECT THEM ALL BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE!

cute

CUTE?! PREPARE TO BE CRUSHED, BUREK!

p cute

(Source: aintasuperhero, via personalproperty)

rousphotos:

Scratching Wesley at the Snake Farm earlier today. Notice his green chin. Capys are not the neatest eaters in the world.
  • Camera: iPhone 5
  • Aperture: f/2.4
  • Exposure: 1/60th
  • Focal Length: 4mm

rousphotos:

Scratching Wesley at the Snake Farm earlier today. Notice his green chin. Capys are not the neatest eaters in the world.

Well by the way, Cartoon Network didn’t want to make Adventure Time to be attractive to women. They tried to get rid of [the female characters of] Princess Bubblegum and Marceline.

Did “Adventure Time” purposefully go against the grain then? You guys famously have a group of episodes where the show switches the gender of every character. Like the heroes “Finn and Jake the dog” become “Fionna and Cake the cat.”

Well, Natasha invented the Fionna episodes even though she’s low on the totem pole at Adventure Time. She’s also a webcomics person. She was already on Adventure Time but yet still made a fan comic for the show she was working on. That’s how she made Fionna and Cake. We loved it, we put it on our Tumblr, and it went insane. We said, “Can you do another one?” It went insane. We did a third one, same thing. So now we convinced Cartoon Network to do a Fionna and Cake episode. What happened? It was the highest rated episode in the history of Adventure Time, it spawned its own licensing.

But when it comes time for her to come up with her own cartoons, they don’t really wanna make one with her. They took other people from the Adventure Time crew. So Natasha came over to us. They never would have made Bee and PuppyCat. It stars a girl. It’s for 20-somethings. Who’s gonna make that? Well, we’re just dumb enough to make it. So we make it. Our audience goes crazy. We made one short. Well, it ended up being two. Our audience, which was unusual for the internet jumps from 70/30 male/female to 50/50. And the excitement was palpable, and not just from young girls. My wife, who is in her 50s, said, “This is the best thing you’ve done since the Powerpuff Girls.” Natasha spoke a language that a whole group of disenfranchised people, women, had never heard spoken in animation.

This is before Frozen became a phenomenon. And I guarantee you, everyone’s gonna try to knock off Frozen and fail. They’re gonna go back to saying, “Only boys like animation.” My goal next year when we launch in the Fall is how are we going make Bee and PuppyCat the Beavis and Butt-Head of the new generation? How do we make it House of Cards for animation?